Podiatrist Blog

Posts for tag: foot

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
August 01, 2018
Category: Diabetic foot Care
Tags: diabetes   podiatrist   foot   blisteres   infected  

Living with diabetes can be hard. Not only do you have to maintain a particular diet, you also have to constantly check in on your body to make sure everything is going well. Those who suffer from diabetes know that the disease can affect much more than their blood sugar. It can also affect their eyesight, nervous system and the feet. One of the most common complications that diabetes brings to the table is diabetic foot ulcers. These foot ulcers can be very dangerous if they are not caught early. Foot ulcers are prone to infection. If they do become infected and a person with diabetes does not treat them quickly, it can lead to the eventual amputation of the foot. Here are some easy tips and tricks to help reduce your chances of getting a diabetic foot ulcer:

  1. It is important to be educated on the signs and the symptoms of diabetic foot ulcers.  It is very common that they appear in patients who also suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This causes a lack of sensation in the feet and makes it hard for the feet to feel pain. Symptoms of ulcers for those with lack of sensation in the feet include increased skin temperature, drainage in socks, redness, and swelling.
  2. Be sure to look at your feet and check in every day. Blisters and cuts to lead to an infected ulcer in those who suffer from diabetes. If you can’t see your feet, find someone to help you look at them regularly.
  3. If you see an ulcer, be sure to take action immediately. A diabetic foot ulcer that goes untreated can lead to amputation of the foot. In order to avoid this, it is imperative that a person calls their podiatrist to treat an ulcer immediately.
  4. Try to stay healthy. Keeping your blood sugar in check and staying connected with your physicians will prevent any serious flare-ups from occurring.
  5. Make an appointment with your podiatrist regularly for check-ups and to share any concerns. Don’t let your feet get to the point of no return.

Diabetes can have a severe effect on the feet. It is important to watch out for any signs or symptoms of complications and treat them promptly. Having some foot problems? Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help you treat your diabetic foot complications. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
July 19, 2018
Category: toenail conditions
Tags: psoriasis   podiatrist   fungus   foot   pain   sports  

One of the worst feelings in the world is when you are peeling off a pair of socks and one of your toenails comes along with it. A toenail that detaches from the nail bed is a common occurrence. Typically, it happens because of an underlying condition or trauma. In less typical situations, chemicals, illness and medications can also cause the nail to become detached. If you lose a toenail, it is important to take the proper precautions while it heals and grows back. It is also important to figure out why it detached in the first place.

First Things First

After your toenail falls off you may be in a bit of a panic. What should I do with my newly-bare nail bed? Here are some tips on how to react before your appointment with your podiatrist:

  • If only part of your toenail has fallen off, don’t try to remove the rest of it – let it be.
  • If part of the detached nail is still barely hanging onto your toe and the rest of the attached part of the nail, get out a pair of sterile nail clippers. Carefully trim off the hanging piece so it does not catch and make the nail worse. If you are uncomfortable doing this, wait to see your podiatrist.
  • Smooth out any jagged edges with a nail file.
  • Clean your toe so there is no debris.
  • Apply antibiotic ointment to the site where the toenails fell off.
  • Cover the area with a bandage.
  • If your toenail has fallen off and will not stop bleeding, seek immediate medical care.

Why Did It Fall Off?

Injury

One reason your toenail could have fallen off is because of an injury. Car accidents, blunt force trauma, and sports can all damage your toenails.

If you received an injury to the foot and notice that your toenail is black or purple underneath, it could indicate that the nail will fall off. This discoloring is often due to the buildup of blood underneath the nail from an injury. Over time, as pressure increases, the nail may separate from the bed and fall off. If this nail is causing you pain, you should see a podiatrist immediately so that they can relieve the buildup of blood inside the nail.

Fungus

Fungus can grow underneath the toenail. This can cause separation of the nail from the bed. Over time, as it progresses, the nail can fall off. The best way to prevent this from occurring is to treat the fungus before it progresses too far. A podiatrist can help prescribe the right antibiotic to kill the fungus before it leaves you with one fewer toenail.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis can also cause you to lose a toenail. This is because, as the skin cells on the nail bed build up, they cause the nail to detach and eventually it will fall off. If you have symptoms such as pitting, thickening, or discoloration of the toenail, then you may have psoriasis. A foot doctor can determine whether or not you are suffering from this condition.

Losing a toenail is never fun, but a podiatrist can help you heal from the incident. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help you treat your detached toenail. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
April 26, 2018
Category: foot fungus

Warts can be a real nuisance, especially to those who enjoy wearing open-toed shoes. Warts are generally due to a viral infection that is passed from person to person. People who go to the gym, pool, or other damp public areas, or who walk with no socks or shoes on, are at a high risk of getting the warts virus. Warts do not always appear right away - sometimes it can take a few days or even a few months. When a wart does surface, however, it is especially important to get it checked out and removed by your podiatrist.

One type of treatment a podiatrist can use for removing a stubborn wart is cryotherapy. Cryotherapy uses liquid nitrogen to freeze off the wart and its affected tissue. As it freezes, the wart dries out and falls off of the foot. This method is very popular for wart removal as well as skin tag removal.

Most warts can be removed using cryotherapy. Sometimes when removing a wart with liquid nitrogen, it takes more than one session to be successful in the removal of the entire wart. A podiatrist will let you know the best course of action after your first appointment.

What are the side effects?

While liquid nitrogen treatment is generally considered very safe, there are potential side effects that some patients may experience. One potential side effect is that the procedure can be somewhat painful. In order to reduce this pain, a podiatrist may sometimes give a local anesthetic to help ease the discomfort of the treatment. Once this medicine ebbs away, the site of the wart removal may be tender.

Another potential problem is if the wart is not completely removed the first time, you must watch it for infection. The wart may also still house the virus that causes it to be contagious. This means that you want to be extra careful to prevent the spreading of the virus. Signs of infection are discolored discharge from the wart site, swelling, fever and fatigue. If you suspect you may have an infection, call your podiatrist immediately.

Warts can be troublesome and sometimes even painful. Call a podiatrist right away if you suspect that you have a wart. These warts can be easily removed without scarring. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can get your warts under control. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
April 11, 2018
Category: Foot Surgery

Having to go through any foot or ankle surgery can be very nerve-racking. The foot and ankle sometimes need to be operated on in order to fix the problems they are facing with surgical tools, reconstruction, and other medical methods. Without the use of surgery, some people would no longer be able to walk. Thanks to today’s technology and advancements, surgery has gone from a large incision to something smaller and easier to recover from.

Arthroscopy is a type of surgery that allows a surgeon to use a very small incision to diagnose and then treat foot and ankle conditions, specifically in the joints.

How is it done?

A tiny telescope is inserted into the designated area and moved around gently. This telescope has a camera and light on it so the surgeon can see into the patient. The image is displayed on a screen in the operating theatre and viewed by the doctor and his or her colleagues, allowing them to make a proper diagnosis.

What disorders can it detect and treat?

  • Big toe joint problems
  • Achilles tendinitis - it can look at the inflamed tissue and remove any dead or dying tissue
  • Ankle fusion surgery
  • Toe fusion surgery
  • Foot fusion surgery
  • Ankle joint defects

Why choose this method?

  • The scar where the incision is made is much smaller than a traditional incision.
  • Your hospital stay will be shorter because the smaller incision is easier to heal from.
  • Shorter rehabilitation time.

What are the risks?

  • Nerve damage
  • Damage to blood vessels
  • If arthroscopy is unsuccessful, open surgery may be used in its place causing longer rehabilitation time

Having a surgery should never be considered lightly. Consult with a podiatrist before making any decisions regarding your foot or ankle health. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help you decide whether or not foot or ankle surgery is right for you and your ailment. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
February 22, 2018
Category: Fractures
Tags: foot   fractured   injury   traumatic   wound   breaks  

Getting a cast on your foot or ankle is a great way to treat a broken or fractured bone. Not only does it prevent the foot from moving around, it sets the foot in the right direction to heal in an optimal way. Casts are generally made out of plaster and acrylic and come in many different colors. Generally, when a cast is placed, it is usually for a period of at least 6-8 weeks. In other instances, the cast can stay on for a longer period of time, depending on the injury sustained. Without a cast, people would have a hard time successfully recovering from a traumatic injury. Although casts are great for healing, they can also become a nuisance. Not only do they make it hard to bathe or shower, the skin underneath can become very itchy to the person who is wearing it.

Admittedly, there are few things more maddening than having an itch that can’t be scratched. People with casts have been known to improvise a variety of tools to reach and eliminate the itch: pens, popsicle sticks, rulers, coat hangers and other household items. Sometimes people even blow inside their cast in hopes of lessening an itch.

The problem is that these approaches can create an even worse problem. If a foreign object breaks the skin, there’s a good chance the wound will get infected. And, because the infection is concealed by a cast, it may not be readily apparent to the person.

The best way to treat the itch is to find safe ways to dry the moisture under the cast. Talcum powder can be very effective, though a tight cast might make it hard to deliver to the itch. Another recommendation is a hair dryer on the cool setting. This will dry out the area and, hopefully, relieve the itch. It is critically important to set the hair dryer to the coolest setting; otherwise, there’s a risk that you will suffer from serious burns. Benadryl can also help control the itch. Benadryl doubles as a sleep aid and can help people avoid scratching in their sleep.

If you choose to ignore these words of caution, you could acquire an infection under your cast and need a whole new cast. Itched until you think you may have created a new problem? Call your podiatrist right away to be sure that no infection has occurred. If you don’t already have a podiatrist, call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto will examine your cast and determine whether it needs to come off to treat underlying wounds. Call 718-624-7537 and make an appointment today.