By Joseph Stuto, DPM
February 28, 2018
Category: Foot Care

Sometimes it is easy to have one drink too many when out at the bar or drinking socially. When too much alcohol is consumed, problems with the feet can occur that are similar to problems that people with diabetes face.

People with diabetes have an abnormal elevation of their blood sugar and lack adequate insulin to break down the amount of sugar that is in their blood. Due to this, the sugar in the blood abnormally enters certain nerve tissue and damages the nerve. This can occur in any type of diabetes and, unfortunately, the nerve damage that is done is usually permanent.

As the nerve damage occurs, a person's ability to determine the difference between sharp and dull, hot and cold, pressure differences, and vibration becomes affected. These senses become dulled and/or altered. The process begins as a burning sensation in the toes. As the condition progresses, the feet become more and more numb. The progression of the condition can be slowed or halted by maintaining normal blood glucose levels.

Alcoholic Peripheral Neuropathy

Alcoholic neuropathy is caused by the prolonged use of alcoholic beverages. Ethanol, the alcoholic component of these beverages, is toxic to nerve tissue and can damage the tissue. In this event, the nerves lose the ability to have normal sensation. The damage to these nerves is permanent. A person with this condition is at the same risk and should take the same precautions, as those with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy can also be caused by exposure to toxins such as pesticides and heavy metals.

Treatment for Peripheral Neuropathy

In order to treat peripheral neuropathy, it is important to treat the blood sugar levels and the habits that are causing the disorder. Vitamin B12 injections may be helpful if the patient has a vitamin B deficiency. There are certain oral medications that may ease the burning pain that can be prescribed by your podiatrist. Topical ointments should only be used with the advice of your podiatrist. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto will examine the feet and determine what is causing that numb feeling. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

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