By Joseph Stuto, DPM
July 17, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: calluses   orthotic  

Calluses are layers of rough and flaky skin on the feet that can cause pain and discomfort. The condition may arise due to constant friction against hard surfaces or persistent application of pressure on the same areas.

In early stages, calluses can be eliminated by using pumice stone – a natural, grainy substance that is made from volcanic rock and used to rub off hardened dead skin.

Use of moisturizing creams after pumicing helps to soften the skin and protect it from hardening again. It is recommended to wear socks so that the moisturizer stays on your feet for a longer duration.

Nevertheless, if your pain lingers and your condition does not improve, the following measures may be discussed with a specialist to treat your calluses:

  • A procedure may be carried out in which the dead skin is cut and removed with a special tool. It is designed to remove the calluses without harming any healthy layers of your skin.
  • An acid patch softens the skin before removing the calluses; it contains salicylic acid that helps to rub off the hard skin. However, it is not to be used without prior consultation from a medical professional, especially by patients with diabetes.
  • Podiatrists recommend using customized orthotic inserts that help reduce pressure on specific areas of your feet and subsequently decrease the chances of developing calluses.

If you are suffering from hard and abrasive calluses on your feet, it is best to seek proper treatment from our podiatrist, Dr. Joseph Stuto at Joseph Stuto, DPM.

Our board-certified podiatrist specializes in treating a range of foot and ankle problems including fungal toenails, arthritis, skin infections, sports injuries, sprains and fractures, muscle and joint pain, structural deformities and more. Our offices are located in Brooklyn Heights (718) 624-7537 and Brooklyn (718) 567-1403. Feel free to contact us, so our team can guide you and provide further information regarding effective foot and ankle-related issues.

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