Podiatrist Blog

Posts for: July, 2018

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
July 25, 2018
Category: foot conditions
Tags: walking   feet   pain   orthotic   overpronation  

Are your feet beginning to look misaligned or disfigured? Do they burn when you walk? Are your hips and back always in pain? No matter how old you are, or what you do regularly it is still estimated that about 45% of people have a foot disorder that not many have heard of. This foot disorder is widely known in the podiatry world as misaligned feet.

What Are Misaligned Feet?

Have you ever noticed that your feet behave differently when you walk? If your feet roll inward when you walk, this could be a sign of misaligned feet. More specifically, when the feet roll inward when walking, this is called overpronation or hyper-pronation. When your feet are properly aligned, your ankle bone sits in the right spot which is directly on top of your heel bone. The front edge of the ankle bone sits slightly overlapping the heel bone and allows for a natural amount of space to occur. This space is called the sinus tarsi.

When your feet are misaligned, the ankle bone doesn’t work properly. Instead, it slips off of the heel bone. The slipping causes the sinus tarsi to collapse which allows the feet to roll inward, eliminating the naturally occurring gap.

How Misaligned Feet Affect You

The average person takes up to 10,000 steps a day if, not more. That means you are constantly on your feet. If you are walking a lot and your body is misaligned, your body ends up being forced to make up for its positioning by putting extra strain and pressure on your ankles, knees, hips and back. This can lead to excessive and chronic pain. Not only does this really hurt, but it can also keep you from your everyday tasks.

What Can You Do About Misaligned Feet?

There are many treatment options available for those who suffer from misaligned feet. One such treatment is the use of orthotic devices. These devices are custom-made for your foot and can help to make up for any deformity you may be dealing with. They are inserted into the shoe and generally you cannot notice them. The most obvious sign that you are wearing them is that your pain is eliminated.

Another option is surgery of the foot. There are multiple kinds of surgery that are available due to technological advances. Many newer surgery practices are minimally invasive and require less downtime than the traditional procedures. Before choosing surgery as an option, it is important to consult a podiatrist. Our office can help make your consultation easy and worry-free. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help you treat your misaligned feet. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.


By Joseph Stuto, DPM
July 19, 2018
Category: toenail conditions
Tags: psoriasis   podiatrist   fungus   foot   pain   sports  

One of the worst feelings in the world is when you are peeling off a pair of socks and one of your toenails comes along with it. A toenail that detaches from the nail bed is a common occurrence. Typically, it happens because of an underlying condition or trauma. In less typical situations, chemicals, illness and medications can also cause the nail to become detached. If you lose a toenail, it is important to take the proper precautions while it heals and grows back. It is also important to figure out why it detached in the first place.

First Things First

After your toenail falls off you may be in a bit of a panic. What should I do with my newly-bare nail bed? Here are some tips on how to react before your appointment with your podiatrist:

  • If only part of your toenail has fallen off, don’t try to remove the rest of it – let it be.
  • If part of the detached nail is still barely hanging onto your toe and the rest of the attached part of the nail, get out a pair of sterile nail clippers. Carefully trim off the hanging piece so it does not catch and make the nail worse. If you are uncomfortable doing this, wait to see your podiatrist.
  • Smooth out any jagged edges with a nail file.
  • Clean your toe so there is no debris.
  • Apply antibiotic ointment to the site where the toenails fell off.
  • Cover the area with a bandage.
  • If your toenail has fallen off and will not stop bleeding, seek immediate medical care.

Why Did It Fall Off?

Injury

One reason your toenail could have fallen off is because of an injury. Car accidents, blunt force trauma, and sports can all damage your toenails.

If you received an injury to the foot and notice that your toenail is black or purple underneath, it could indicate that the nail will fall off. This discoloring is often due to the buildup of blood underneath the nail from an injury. Over time, as pressure increases, the nail may separate from the bed and fall off. If this nail is causing you pain, you should see a podiatrist immediately so that they can relieve the buildup of blood inside the nail.

Fungus

Fungus can grow underneath the toenail. This can cause separation of the nail from the bed. Over time, as it progresses, the nail can fall off. The best way to prevent this from occurring is to treat the fungus before it progresses too far. A podiatrist can help prescribe the right antibiotic to kill the fungus before it leaves you with one fewer toenail.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis can also cause you to lose a toenail. This is because, as the skin cells on the nail bed build up, they cause the nail to detach and eventually it will fall off. If you have symptoms such as pitting, thickening, or discoloration of the toenail, then you may have psoriasis. A foot doctor can determine whether or not you are suffering from this condition.

Losing a toenail is never fun, but a podiatrist can help you heal from the incident. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help you treat your detached toenail. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.


By Joseph Stuto, DPM
July 12, 2018
Tags: muscles   podiatrist   pain   cramp  

When you are minding your own business and then suddenly you are inflicted with a leg cramp, the pain can be overwhelming and make you stop in your tracks. Leg cramps can occur for numerous reasons, but if you already have Peripheral Vascular Disease then your leg cramps may be due to your underlying condition.

Peripheral Vascular Disease is a condition that encompasses any disease or disorder of the circulatory system that occurs outside of the brain or the heart. Not every case is the same or presents the same symptoms. Some cases can cause blockages in the arteries while other cases can cause the hardening of the arteries which, in turn, causes a person to experience leg and foot cramps.

Generally, leg cramps can be caused by the decrease of blood flow in the legs and be feet. Although the muscles do not actually contract during this type of cramp, the sensation of the cramp can come about during activity and lessen with rest

The cramping is caused by the hardening and narrowing of the arteries in the body. This restricts the amount of blood that is working its way to the leg muscles and can cause pain. The muscles need more blood during activity and this is why the pain is usually onset during activities. When a person is at rest, the muscles need less blood and so the pain subsides.

Not sure if you have peripheral vascular disease? The main symptom of the disease is the tightening of the foot or leg with accompanied pain. It usually occurs during exercise and worsens with more activity. Other symptoms of peripheral vascular disease are tingling, numbness, cold skin, hair loss and abnormal toenail growth. Sometimes the feet will turn very pale when lowered, but color will improve when elevated.

If you have cramping sensations in your legs and feet, it may be due to peripheral vascular disease. In order to diagnose this condition, it is important to see a podiatrist. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help you get to the bottom of your foot and leg cramps. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.


By Joseph Stuto, DPM
July 02, 2018
Tags: Lisfranc Injury   Blistering   Sprain  

Getting into a motor vehicle accident can be a very scary occurrence. Not only is it very stressful, but it can also cause a physical injury to the body, especially the feet. When a car gets into a collision, it is likely that the body of the car is crushed in and sometimes the passenger in the car suffers from that impact. One common traumatic injury that can occur from a car accident is called a Lisfranc injury.

The Lisfranc joint is the area of the foot where the long metatarsal bones and the arch bones connect. There is also a ligament in this area known as the Lisfranc ligament. Its job is to hold these bones together and to aid in flexibility and mobility.

Cause

Automotive accidents, military members, runners, jockeys and horseback riders, football players and athletes in other contact sports are all at risk for this injury. This is because Lisfranc injuries occur from a traumatic force on the foot.

3 Types of Lisfranc Injuries

  1. Sprains can plague the Lisfranc joint. When the muscles are stretched out and weakened, they can cause a sprain which has symptoms that include pain, inflammation and joint instability.
  2. Fractures occur when a small piece of the bone chips off or when the fracture penetrates the whole bone on the midfoot. It can be very painful and often needs an x-ray for diagnosis.
  3. If there is enough force, the Lisfranc bones can be forced away from each other and become dislocated. A podiatrist can help set these bones back into place.

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Pain when pressure is applied
  • Unable to bear weight on foot
  • Bruising
  • Blistering
  • Foot suddenly becomes wider

Treatment Options

A Lisfranc injury should be treated by a trained podiatrist as soon as possible. If the injury worsens, it can permanently affect a person’s overall mobility.  A podiatrist may suggest some of the following treatments to help heal this type of injury.

  • Immobilization – this prevents the foot from moving around and aids in the healing process.
  • Over-the-counter or prescribed medications to help deal with pain and swelling.
  • The use of ice and elevation to reduce swelling and pain.

Lisfranc injuries can be very painful, but they are treatable. If you suspect that you have sustained a Lisfranc injury, call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can diagnose your Lisfranc Injury. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.