Podiatrist Blog

Posts for category: foot pain

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
June 27, 2018
Category: foot pain
Tags: Bunions   shoe   podiatrist   pain   overused   joint   inflammation   metatarsal bones  

We all need our feet every day. Not only do you need your feet to walk to the car, to drive, and to get to your workplace, you also need them to chase children, haul in groceries, and clean the house. Your feet are an essential part of your daily routine, and when they begin to experience pain, they can slow you down and change your routine drastically. A common pain that is felt in tired and overused feet is known as synovitis.

If you feel a sharp or aching pain centered at the bottom of the second toe, directly in the ball of the foot, then you may be experiencing the pain of synovitis. This pain can indicate an even bigger problem. That is, it can indicate that the toe bones are separating from the long metatarsal bones within the foot.

One frequent cause of synovitis is increased and excessive pressure and stress on the bones of the foot. This can be due to exercise, a new job, or any other similar increase in activity. The ligaments begin to break down and become permanently damaged. This loosens their hold on the bones and allows them to separate over time.

Exercise isn’t always the only culprit for the cause of synovitis. Wearing high-heeled shoes, getting bunions, having a high arch or having a long second toe can cause stress on the foot and lead to this condition. Even rheumatoid arthritis can lead to synovitis.

Symptoms of synovitis are a sharp pain in the ball of the foot, inflammation and feeling like there is a stone in one’s shoe when walking.

Treating synovitis is not impossible, but in most cases surgery is not necessary. Sometimes very severe cases of synovitis may require surgery to heal the affected foot. Common treatments that podiatrists may prescribe include splinting, icing, or taping of the joint. Sometimes a cast, a boot, crutches or other forms of immobilization are needed to help the healing process.

If you suspect that you are suffering from synovitis, call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can heal your synovitis. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
June 13, 2018
Category: foot pain
Tags: orthotics   swelling   hurt   bone   flat foot   arch pain  

Walking around with pain in your feet can be very aggravating. First, you want to know what is causing your feet to hurt. Second, it is disrupting the flow of your day. Foot pain can make it hard to walk, stand, or bear weight. This can have a direct impact on your job and responsibilities. If you are plagued by flat feet and are experiencing foot pain, you could be suffering from accessory navicular pain.

What Is the Accessory Navicular?

Sometimes when the foot is formed inside the womb, it creates an extra piece of bone or cartilage. This bonus part of the foot can be found on the inside of the inner foot near the arch. It is located close to a tendon and, due to rubbing and foot formation, can become inflamed and painful over time. Not everyone is born with this extra bone.

What Causes Accessory Navicular Pain?

  • Foot or ankle trauma
  • Improperly fitting footwear
  • Overuse or extreme exercise
  • Flat-footedness

Signs and Symptoms of Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Symptoms usually appear during early adolescence. This is because the body is developing, and as the foot develops it becomes more evident that the extra bone is there and taking up space. This bone can begin to get aggravated and swell. A young adult will start complaining of foot pain and could have a hard time walking. Other symptoms include:

Treatment

  • Orthotics -  These are custom made for each individual foot. They are seamlessly inserted into the shoe and are worn every day. They can help to alleviate stress and pain in the arch and reduce swelling and inflammation.
  • Physical Therapy – A podiatrist may ask you to begin physical therapy if you come to the office with this condition. Physical therapy can build up the strength of the foot which can help alleviate pain.
  • Ice – A podiatrist may have you ice your foot regularly to help reduce inflammation, redness, and swelling.
  • Immobilization – in severe cases, immobilization may be required. This can be in the form of an air cast or a splint. A podiatrist will teach you how to properly immobilize your foot to help it heal.

Pain in the foot does not have to get you down. Instead, call our office to make an appointment to get rid of the pain that an accessory navicular can cause. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help get your accessory navicular pain in control. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
June 06, 2018
Category: foot pain

Getting a diagnosis of metatarsalgia can be very nerve-wracking and confusing. Not only does it describe a group of symptoms, but it can leave you with more questions than you started your appointment with. Metatarsalgia is actually a group of symptoms that affect the feet. People diagnosed with this condition usually show signs of pain, swelling and inflammation of the foot. There are many different things that can contribute to this condition and some of them are due to lifestyle habits and underlying conditions. Here are three of the most common scenarios and a breakdown of why they cause this pain.

Stress Fractures - when a stress fracture occurs in the toe or metatarsal bones, pain is often immediate. This pain causes a person to change their gait to accommodate the injury. This gait change causes excess pressure to build up on the back of the foot and cause the swelling, inflammation and pain known with this condition. Stress fractures often occur in athletes or individuals who endure large amounts of pressure and stress for long periods of time. This is why it is common to see athletes with these injuries.

Your Foot Shape is Affecting You - if you have high arches or flat feet, then it is likely that you will be dealing with these symptoms at least once in your life. High-arched feet sometimes have longer metatarsal bones which cause more pressure on the forefoot. This pressure can cause inflammation and swelling in that area.

Inflammatory Disorders - conditions such as gout and arthritis are known to cause inflammation. This can cause pain in the bottom of the foot and lead to this diagnosis.

Other contributors

Sometimes a combination of the factors listed above can cause metatarsalgia. In order to determine whether or not this is the case for you, it is important to see a podiatrist to get a proper diagnosis. Not only can they diagnose your condition, but they can also help you treat the symptoms.

Don’t have a podiatrist? Call us today. Call Joseph Stuto, DPM of Brooklyn, New York. There Dr. Joseph A. Stuto and Joseph C. Stuto can help get to the bottom of your bottom foot pain. Call 718-624-7537and make an appointment today.

By Joseph Stuto, DPM
May 03, 2017
Category: foot pain
Tags: Gout  

In an earlier article, I talked about gout and what it is.  Sometimes gout can be recurrent.  In this case, doctors tend to prescribe certain medications to help prevent future gout attacks.  Do you have symptoms that are common to gout?  If you do, and have an examination with your podiatrist, he may then refer you to a specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other inflammatory joint conditions (a rheumatologist).

In this case, it is smart to get ready for your appointment and know what to expect from the doctor.  To prepare, you can:

  • Note important personal information- like any recent changes or major stressors in your life.
  • Write down your symptoms, including when they started and how often they occur.
  • Take a family member or friend along… if possible, this is a good idea, as sometimes it can be difficult to remember all the information provided to you during an appointment.  An extra set of ears is helpful to help remember the details!
  • Make a list of your key medical info- include any other conditions for which you’re being treated, and any meds you’re taking; as well as any vitamins or supplements.
  • Find out if gout runs in your family, and if anyone else tends to get gout in your immediate family.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.  Creating a list in advance, can help, as you are less likely to forget the things you wanted to ask, and this helps you make the most of your time with the doctor.  Examples of pertinent questions are: 
    • What tests do you recommend?
    • What are the possible causes of my symptoms or condition?
    • Are there any treatments or lifestyle changes that might help my symptoms now?
    • Do I need to see a different specialist?
    • What are the possible side effects of the drugs you’re prescribing?
    • How soon after beginning treatment can I expect my symptoms to start to improve?
    • Will I need to take medications long term?
    • Is it safe for me to drink alcohol?
    • Do you recommend any changes to my diet?
    • Do you recommend any websites I should check out for more info?

After your various visits with your podiatrist and rheumatologist, you will most likely receive a treatment plan, and have various tests.  Hopefully, you will be well on the road to relieving your gout symptoms and will get a plan in place to try to prevent further gout attacks!  If you need any further help, please call our office at either of our convenient Brooklyn locations.  Dr. Joseph Stuto is here to help!